University of Connecticut University of UC Title Fallback Connecticut

Invisible Perspective

An exhibit to pay tribute to Native American Indians. Presented here is an excerpt from Vincent Filardi’s Artist Statement…
“My proposal for UConn, put forward for consideration is the theme of the American Indian, my interest in their lives has been with me for as long as I’ve had the opportunity to read about their communion with the Earth and all that reside. I became fascinated at the geometry of dress ware and how this alone would empower them as they made their way.”“In 1972 I read Dee Browns, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, this would change the entire scenery of my beliefs and I began to see the stories, as the American Indians look of how the American Frontier, was created.”
“The great conquest of their land, the original Americans they “never” saw ownership to the vast horizons and yet the, Algonquin, Apache, Cheyenne, Dakota, Nez Perce, Utes, Poncas,, Navaho, Iroquois, Mohawk and others began to see the white man, consume and manipulate the land that their Fore Fathers lived for and their way of life, being destroyed right before their eyes. With focus on the great contribution they have given to Humankind”

While visiting “Invisible Perspective” please take a short walk to across Franklin Street to our Whitey Heist “mini park”. There you can view UConn’s permanent tribute to Native Americans. In the park you will see Jim Sanborn’s 6’x26′ bronze serpentine sculpture, which is a acknowledgement to Native American settlements in the Stamford area when during the 17th and 18th Centuries the State of Connecticut was purchased from its Native American inhabitants. The piece of land on which this park sits was called Rippowam (cliff of rocks) in the Algonquin language. The small amount traded for these lands are listed in sandblasted strips of text on the polished granite slabs which form part of this “mini park”. The difficulties the Native American Indians had with the colonial newcomers is elegantly stated in an Algonquin document called the Mashpee Petition 1751. The sculpture is inscribed with the Mashpee Petition 1751’s text in 3 different languages: Binary conversion, English translation and Algonquin.

 

Vincent & Janet Filardi

Vincent & Janet Filardi

Native American Historical Sculpture

Native American Historical Sculpture

 

For more information on the Whitey Heist Park visit…http://stamford.uconn.edu/park/

 

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